Course Descriptions

CHEE 400L/500L – Water Chemistry for Engineers Lab (1 unit)
Applications of canned programs for solution of complex equilibrium water chemistry problems. Graduate-level requirements include applying canned computer algorithms to solve equilibrium chemistry problems.
Usually offered: Fall

CHEE 400R/500R – Water Chemistry for Engineers (3 units)
The course provides an introduction to primarily aqueous-phase equilibria governing water quality characteristics of interest in portable water supply, wastewater treatment and natural waters. Specific topics covered include acid-base and metal-ligand equilibria, oxidation-reduction reactions and chemical reaction thermodynamics. There is some emphasis on equilibria governing inter-phase (gas-liquid, solid-liquid) chemical distribution. Mathematical approaches to prediction of equilibrium chemical speciation are stressed. Graduate-level requirements include the application of canned computer algorithms to solve equilibrium chemistry problems.
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 401A/501A – Chemical and Environmental Engineering Laboratory I (1 unit)
Laboratory of environmental engineering operations.
Prerequisite(s): CHEE 420
Usually offered: Fall

CHEE 415/515 – Microelectronics Manufacturing and the Environment (3 units)
This course will focus on presentation of the basic semiconductor processes which have direct environmental implications.
Identical to: ECE 415
Usually offered: Fall

CHEE 420/520 – Chemical Reaction Engineering (3 units)
Application of thermodynamic and kinetic fundamentals to the analysis and design of chemical reactors. Graduate-level requirements will include an in-depth research paper on a current topic.
Usually offered: Fall

CHEE 435/535 – Corrosion and Degradation (3 units)
The science of corrosion and degradation reactions and its application to engineering problems.
Prerequisite(s): MSE 331R or MSE 412, or prerequisite or concurrent registration in CHEM 480B
Credit for: 2 units engineering science, 1 unit engineering design.
Identical to: MSE 435; MSE is home department.
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 471/571 – Rheology: Principles and Applications (3 units)
Fundamental principles of rheological behavior of materials. Non-Newtonian viscous behavior. Application of Non-Newtonian fluid mechanics. Viscoelasticity. The relation between microscope structure and behavior; polymer solutions, slurries, and colloidal systems. Graduate-level requirements includes use of increased experience in terms of knowledge of mathematical techniques applied to Transport and Phenomena problems.
Prerequisite: Undergraduate level of fluid mechanics.
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 473/573 – Biodegradation of Hazardous Organic Compounds (3 units)
To learn and integrate the basic principles of microbiology required for understanding of application of bioremediation to contaminated sites. To become familiar with current research in bioremediation. To learn to solve problems often encountered in application of bioremediation.
Identical to: CE 473/573
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 476A/576A – Water Treatment System Design (3 units)
Application of theory and engineering experience to the design of unit operations for the production of potable water. Covers water regulations, conventional treatment technologies and selected advance treatment topics. Graduate-level requirements include a research paper.
Identical to: CE 476A/576A
Usually offered: Fall

CHEE 476B/576B – Wastewater Treatment Design System (3 Units)
Application of theory and engineering experience to the design of unit operations for the treatment of wastewater. Covers water regulations, conventional treatment technologies and selected advanced treatment topics. Graduate-level requirements include additional homework problems, a course paper, and additional exam questions.
Identical to: CE 476B
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 477L/577L – Microbiology for Engineers Lab (1 unit)
This course focuses on the principles of microbiology, including physiology, metabolism, genetics and ecology. The course explores fundamental microbial processes as well as their environmental significance and application in environmental engineering. A laboratory is associated with the lecture course to provide laboratory skills in basic and applied microbiology. Graduate-level requirements include a mandatory assignment where course participants will isolate and characterize microorganisms with a specific metabolic activity. Each student will establish materials and methods required for the assignment individually. The assignments will result in a written report and an oral presentation.
Prerequisite: Concurrent registration, CHEE 477R/577R
Usually offered : Fall

CHEE 477R/577R – Microbiology for Engineers (3 units)
This course focuses on the principles of microbiology, including physiology, metabolism, genetics and ecology. The course explores fundamental microbial processes as well as their environmental significance and application in environmental engineering. A laboratory is associated with lecture course to provide laboratory skills in basic and applied microbiology. Graduate-level requirements include oral reports.
Usually offered: Fall

CHEE 478/578 – Introduction to Hazardous Waste Management (3 units)
Management, planning, legal and engineering aspects of liquid and solid hazardous waste treatment and disposal. Graduate-level requirements include a report on an in-depth review of interdisciplinary aspects of an existing project (with a non-university project engineer).
Identical to: CE 478/578
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 481A/581A – Engineering of Biological Processes (3 units)
To learn to apply to the design of biological systems principles of engineering, science and mathematics, including, but not limited to statistics, kinetics, sensors and bioreactor design and scale up. To explore and be familiar with the principal areas of biological engineering, such as food process engineering, tissue engineering, and other large-scale fermentation processes. Graduate-level requirements include an oral presentation and belonging to the Journal Club.
Prerequisite(s): MATH 254 AND MCB 182 or MIC 205A or CHEE 450 or instructor approval
Identical to: ABE 481A/581A
Usually offered: Fall

CHEE 481B/581B – Cell and Tissue Engineering (3 units)
Application of engineering fundamentals, such as heat and mass transport, thermodynamics, kinetics, and the process of design to the fields of biotechnology, fermentation, food processing and bioseparation. Graduate-level requirements include two additional design projects, homework problems requiring a greater degree of mathematics, and exams containing questions which evaluate a higher level of thought processes.
Prerequisite: MATH 254
Identical to: ABE 481B/581B; ABE is home department
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 482/582 – Analysis of Emerging Environmental Contaminants (3 units)
Contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) have become major scientific and political issues. Many of these environmental contaminants have been detected in air, water, soil, and/or biota. Most CECs are identified and quantified based on non-standardized methods, often with limited or questionable quality assurance and quality control. At times, public policy and resource allocation are based on these uncertain data. Moreover, there are thousands of potential contaminants for which no analytical methodologies have yet been developed. Through this course, stuents will become familiar with the diversity of analytical (instrumental) and bioanalytical (bioassays) tools currently available, and will gain knowledge as to the pros and cons of each aproach. The class also will discuss future opportunities, such as development of on-line sensors and minaturization of environmental methods. While the emphasis of the course will be on water analysis, the class will also briefly discuss implications for other environmental matrices such as biosolids, sediments, solids, tissues, body fluids, and aerosols. Contaminants will be discussed in terms of classes (i.e., pharmaceuticals, steroid hormones, nanoparticles, metals, disinfection byproducts) as well as physical chemical properites (i.e., water solubility, acid/base, volatility, molecular weight, and molecular geometry). This class will provide a hands-on experience with the key instrument platforms such as gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection, inductively coupled plasma with mass spectrometric detection, liquid chromatography with diode array UV, fluorescence, and mass spectrometric detection. Instruction on select instrumental software platforms will also be demonstrated and basic integration, calibration, and data export will be discussed. Cellular and whole animal bioassays for the screening of complex mixtures of contaminants will be discussed and demonstrated. The key principals of toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) will be covered in this class, along with real world examples of how TIE is used to determine causes of observed environmental toxicity. Students will work independently and as groups to investigate a key issue relative to environmental analysis, wirte a paper on this topic, and present and defend their findings before the class.
Identical to: ABE 482/582; CHEE is home department
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 487/587 – Topics in Transport Phenomena (3 units)
Syllabus (PDF)
Special topics in transport phenomena oriented towards practical applications in specific industrial and research areas. Topics include the dynamics of non-Newtonian fluids, thermal radiation, transport in multiphases systems, design of fluid transport systems, atmospheric transport and mechanics of interfaces.
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 489/589 – Trends in Nanomedicine Engineering - Fundamentals of Therapeutics and Drug Delivery Systems (3 units)
Nanomedicine engineering research involves the advance of diagnostics for rapid screening and monitoring, controlled and localized drug delivery, targeted cancer therapies, enhanced cell material interactions, scaffolds for tissue engineering, and gene delivery systems amongst others. Developments in nanomedicine engineering to effectively benefit patients require the interaction of diverse disciplines including chemistry, biochemistry, biophysics, engineering, materials science, cellular and molecular biology, pharmaceutical sciences and clinical translational medicine. This interdisciplinary course will address how materials are fabricated, characterized and interact in biological systems. The emphasis of the course will be in the application of therapeutics and controlled release drug delivery systems. Integration of biomaterial nanostructures and release analysis will be highlighted throughout the course. Through lectures, paper reviews, class discussions, experimental lab exposure, class presentations and homework assignments, students will develop an in depth understanding of the various ways nanoparticles have been used as diagnostics tools, in advancing tissue engineering and in how drug delivery systems can be improved to overcome the problems associated with typical oral and intravenous administration. Several types of drug and gene delivery methods including oral, transdermal, implantable, targeted and pulmonary will be discussed. The course will highlight the rational design of drug delivery devices based on the fundamental understanding in engineering, pharmacology, chemistry and biomaterials science.
Usually offered: Spring 

CHEE 502 – Advanced Engineering Analysis (3 units)
Process modeling techniques, residence time distribution theory, dynamics of distributed parameter systems, nonlinear parameter estimation.
Prerequisite: CHEE 420
Usually offered: Fall

CHEE 505 – Advanced Chemical Engineering Transport Phenomena (3 units)
Momentum, energy and mass transport in continua, solution of multidimensional laminar flow problems, turbulence, boundary layer theory.
Prerequisite: CHEE 305
Usually offered: Fall

CHEE 506 – Advanced Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (3 units)
Advanced applications of First and Second Laws, nonideal gases and liquids and their mixtures, principles of chemical equilibrium, and molecular theory.
Prerequisite: CHEE 326
Usually offered: Fall

CHEE 510 – Logistics of Writing a Manuscript for the Chemical and Environmental Engineering (1 unit)
The purpose of this course is to prepare graduate students on how to organize to write a scientific manuscript. The course will teach students how to organize data and their thoughts to prepare for a creating a manuscript. Students will be taught to select data, prepare the data for presentation, and develop a general and focused narrative for the manuscript. With narrative selected, students will be taught to develop hypotheses and to use their data to support or reject each hypothesis. Students will learn to research the literature to find evidence to provide a theoretical framework for their manuscript and to provide supplemental support for the findings from the data that either support or reject the formulated hypotheses. The course will aide students in generating an overall outline and detailed outline within sections to structure their manuscript. Lastly, the course will provide basic guidelines to help students with strategies in writing paragraphs and sentences used in technical writing. The overall goal of the course is to enable students to independently make a draft of a scientific manuscript. Student will be asked to bring their own research data to course. During the course, those data will be converted step by step to a first draft, where each step will take place during each week of the semester.
Usually offered: Fall, Spring

CHEE 525 – Emerging Issues in Water Quality (3 units)
This course will investigate, discuss, and debate major emerging water quality issues which threaten our water sustainability and the regulatory paradigms to address these challenges.
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 530 – Advanced Chemical Reaction Engineering (3 units)
Kinetics of heterogeneous reaction systems, non-ideal flow reactor models, reactor stability, analysis of industrial reactors.
Prerequisite: CHEE 420
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 542 – Bioremediation of Inorganic Contaminants (2 units)
This course focuses on biological remediation techniques for inorganic contaminants (nitrogen and sulfur-containing compounds, iron, heavy metals, metalloids and radionuclide’s). The course explores fundamental chemical and biological processes as well as engineering aspects.
Prerequisite(s):  Prior course experience with biochemistry (e.g. CHEE 450 or microbiology). CHEE 577R is highly recommended, but not required.
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 569A – Air Pollution I: Gases (3 units)
An introduction to the chemistry and physics of the troposphere and stratosphere. Topics include natural biogeochemical cycles; atmospheric photochemistry; stratospheric ozone; urban ozone and particulate matter; atmospheric visibility; acid deposition; air pollution meteorology; Gaussian plume model; photochemical model; air quality regulations. Graduate-level requirements include additional homework and other exercises.
Identical to: ATMO 596A
Usually offered: Fall

CHEE 569B – Air Pollution II: Aerosols (3 units)
An introduction to the chemistry and physics of atmospheric aerosols. Topics include aerosol sources and sinks; basic aerosol properties; single aerosol mechanics; aerosol population dynamics; atmospheric aerosol optics; aerosols and climate; aerosols and health; regional haze; aerosol measurement techniques. Graduate-level requirements include additional homework and other exercises.
Prerequisite(s): CHEM 103B
Identical to: ATMO 596B, SWES 569B
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 572 – Interfacial Chemistry of Biomolecules in Environmental Systems (3 units)
Introduction to the chemical and adhesive properties of macromolecules at interfaces. The fundamental physico-chemical forces that govern adsorption of macromolecules at interfaces and inter-particle adhesion will be discussed. Topics such as surface tension, self-assembly, adsorption of polymers and biomolecules, and bacterial cell adhesion will be discussed with emphasis on environmental applications.
Identical to: WES 572
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 574 – Environmental Transport Processes (3 units)
Engineering concerns in toxic and hazardous waste management with focus on aspects of chemical transport between air, water and soil systems, and microbial degradation processes in natural and engineering environment.
Identical to: CE 574
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 583 – Remote Sensing Instrumentation and Techniques (3 units)
Development of instrumentation, measurement and signal processing techniques required for electromagnetic remote sensing applications with emphasis on atmospheric remote sensing.
Identical to: ATMO 583, ECE 583
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 591 – Preceptorship
Specialized work consisting of individual instruction and practice in chemical or environmental engineering. Activities may include instruction in laboratories and discussion sessions, and preparation and support of course materials.
Usually offered: Fall, Spring

CHEE 594 – Practicum (1-5 units)
Practical professional training. Student will play an engineer-in-training role within a municipal agency or consulting firm. These periods of apprenticeship or training and professional activities will be arranged in an ad hoc basis to the mutual satisfaction of student's advisor and the sponsoring agency.
Usually offered: Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II

CHEE 597A – Engineering GK-12 (1 unit)
This workshop will support graduate fellows working in K-12 classrooms through the Engineering program. Through weekly discussions, reading and journaling, graduate students will reflect upon their classroom experiences, share teaching strategies and learn about the processes of teaching and learning engineering.
May be repeated: A maximum of 2 unit(s) or 2 completions(s).
Usually offered: Fall, Spring

CHEE 597B – Engineering Outreach Methodology (1 unit)
This workshop will support graduate students interested in K-12 outreach and working in K-12 classrooms through the Engineering program. Through weekly discussions, assignments, reading and journaling, graduate students will learn teaching methods and about how engineering concepts are incorporated into everyday classes.
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 605 – Advanced Mass Transport Theory (3 units)
Theoretical aspects of binary and multicomponent systems utilizing penetration, surface renewal and boundary layer transport concepts.
Prerequisite: CHEE 505
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 676 – Advanced Water and Wastewater Treatment (3 units)
Advanced design for water and wastewater treatment. Emphasis on modern environmental engineering processes for water and wastewater treatment.
Identical to: CE 676
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 696A – Chemical and Environmental Engineering Graduate Seminar (1 unit)
The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research though discussion, report, and/or papers.
May be repeated: for credit 6 times (maximum 7 enrollments).
Usually offered: Fall, Spring

CHEE 696B – Combustion (1 unit)
The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
May be repeated: A maximum of 7 unit(s) or 7 completions(s).
Usually offered: Fall, Spring

CHEE 696F – Fluid Mechanics (1 unit)
The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
May be repeated: A maximum of 7 unit(s) or 7 completions(s).
Usually offered: Fall, Spring

CHEE 900 – Research (1-5 units)
Individual research, not related to thesis or dissertation preparation, by graduate students.
May be repeated: Course may be repeated for a maximum of Unlimited unit(s) or Unlimited completion(s).
Usually offered: Fall, Spring Summer I, Summer II

CHEE 909 – Master’s Report (1-4 units)
Individual study or special project or formal report thereof submitted in lieu of thesis for master's degree.
Usually offered: Fall, Spring

CHEE 910 – Thesis (1-12 units)
Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or thesis writing). Maximum total credit permitted varies with the major department.
May be repeated: Course may be repeated for a maximum of unlimited unit(s) or unlimited completion(s).
Usually offered: Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II

CHEE 920 – Dissertation (1-12 units)
Research for the doctoral dissertation (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or dissertation writing).
May be repeated: Course may be repeated for a maximum of unlimited unit(s) or unlimited completion(s).
Usually offered: Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II

University of Arizona College of Engineering